Facebook Twitter Linkedin
HOME btn ABOUT US btn JOURNALS btn AUTHORS btn CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS btn SEARCH btn CONTACT US  
 

home

bred

bred

bred

bred

bred

bred

bred

 

   LIST OF ACADEMIA JOURNALS

btn Academia Journal of Biotechnology

btn Journal of Business and Economic     Management

btn  Academia Journal of Medicinal Plants

btn Academia Journal of Environmental     Sciences

btn Academia Journal of Agricultural     Research

btn Academia Journal of Educational     Research

btn Academia Journal of Food Research

btn Academia Journal of Scientific     Research

btn Academia Journal of Microbiology    Research

btn  Engineering and Technology

btn Academia Journal of Pharmacy and     Pharmacology

btn Medicine and Medical Sciences

 

 


Classifications

  1. Acad J Environ Sci

Google Scholar

 

Related Articles

  1. Google Scholar

  2. PubMed

ajes-banner

Research Article

Academia Journal of Environmental Science 6(2): 020-036, February 2018
DOI: 10.15413/ajes.2018.0102
ISSN: 2315-778X
2018 Academia Publishing

Abstract


Assessment of indigenous soil and water conservation practices of East Hararghe Zone, Ethiopia

 

Accepted 5th February, 2018

 

Samuel Lindi Megersa

Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Fedis Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia.

 

Ethiopia is regarded as the roof of eastern Africa and is considered water tower of the region. Indigenous knowledge of soil and water conservation practices are common in many parts of the country. It is common to see slope lands brought into cultivation where land pressures are high. In many instances in the past, SWC mechanisms were built without proper design. Thus, it is common to see different forms of soil and water conservation practices across the country. Hence, many area of the country’s top soil is under severing condition of erosion; however, the East Hararghe people have indigenous SWC mechanisms which enable them to save the soil from erosion. The objectives of this study were to identify indigenous SWC practices physically and socio-economically to harness and promote its use and to characterize indigenous soil and water conservation practices of the study area for further improvement. In this study, both primary and secondary data collection techniques were used. This includes physical SWC structure parameters: (Land Slope (LS), Vertical Interval (VI), Horizontal Interval (HI), Length of the structure (L)), interview, focal group discussion, observation, document analysis and other data source. The finding of the study shows that the indigenous SWC mechanisms in the community are developed over a very long period of time. The overriding solutions to soil erosion problems include options ranging from single mechanical or agronomic practice to watershed scale. Some of the common indigenous SWC practices identified in the study area were: Mechanical SWC practices (soil bund, stone bund, terrace, micro-basin and tied ridge) and biological SWC practices (grass for structure stabilization and tree plantation). Agroforestry practices (algae check dam, sifting cultivation) consistent with similar practices found in different parts of the country. Bunds and terraces are widely used in the study areas and appreciated by all the farmers. Bunds and terraces constructed by farmers were measured for comparison with scientific value, the measured and calculated parametric value were different from each other; these indicated that, farmers construct these structures without any scientific calculation, which leads to farm land fragmentation and labor intensive. Therefore, these indigenous practices need governmental or non-governmental organizations attention for further improvement.

Key words: Indigenous knowledge, characterization, identification, soil and water conservation practice.
 

This is an open access article published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this article as:
Megersa SL (2018). Assessment of indigenous soil and water conservation practices of East Hararghe Zone, Ethiopia. Acad. J. Environ. Sci. 6(2): 020-036.

Copyright © 2018 Academia Publishing. All rights reserved